Olive Oil & The Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Women

Olive Oil & The Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Women

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Title: Olive oil consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes in US women

Author: Guasch-Ferre et al

Journal: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Objective: To evaluate the association between olive oil intake and type 2 diabetes in a US population.

Background

The primary type of fat found in olive oil is monounsaturated fatty acids. These, along with polyunsaturated fat, are the types of dietary fat that are considered healthy. This is in opposition to hydrogenated and trans fats which are bad for you, and possible saturated fat as well, although the evidence is mixed on that one.

Intake of monounsaturated fatty acids has been shown to lower:

  • Bad cholesterol (LDL)
  • Risk of heart attack
  • Risk of Stroke

Type 2 Diabetes, or non-insulin dependent diabetes, affects almost 400 million people around the world.     The complications from uncontrolled or poorly controlled diabetes are profound and include:

  • Cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke
  • Nerve damage (neuropathy)
  • Kidney damage (nephropathy).
  • Eye damage (retinopathy).
  • Foot damage.
  • Skin conditions.
  • Hearing impairment.
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • and more

The authors of this study sought to explore whether olive oil could reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Methods

They followed 59,930 women (37–65 yrs) from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS 1) and 85,157 women (26–45 yrs) from the Nurses Health Study 2 who were free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at the start of the study.

Diet was assessed by food-frequency questionnaires.

New cases of Type 2 Diabetes were identified through self-report and confirmed by supplementary questionnaires.

Results

With 22 years of follow-up, there were 9652 total new cases of type 2 diabetes between the two studies.

After adjusting for major lifestyle and dietary factors, there was a 10% reduction in risk of Type 2 Diabetes in those who consumed .1 tablespoon (.8 g) of total olive oil per day compared with those who did not. (HR = 0.90; 95% CI 0.82, 0.99).

For salad dressing olive oil (HR = 0.95; 95% CI 0.87, 1.04), there was a 5% reduction in risk of Type 2 Diabetes (which was not statistically significant) and a 15% reduction in risk for olive oil added to food or bread (HR = 0.85; 95% CI 0.74, 0.98).

The authors estimated that substituting olive oil (8 g/d) for stick margarine, butter, or mayonnaise was associated with 5%, 8%, and 15% lower risk of Type 2 Diabetes, respectively,.

Conclusions

Total olive oil intake is associated with a substantially lower risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes in women.

Furthermore, an additional 8g/day intake can reduce the risk of 6% reduced risk of Type 2 Diabetes.

Finally, substituting other types of fats and salad dressings (stick, margarine, butter, mayonnaise) with olive oil can also reduce your risk.

Original Article

Guasch-Ferre, M., Hruby, A., & Salas-Salvado, J. (2015). Olive oil consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes in US women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,102(2), 479-486. doi:10.3945/ajcn.115.112029

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