Coffee Consumption & Risk of Colorectal Cancer

Coffee Consumption & Risk of Colorectal Cancer

Watchhttps://youtu.be/js5B9NXJ_40

Title: Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer.

Author: Schmit et al

Journal: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers Prevention

Objective: To assess association between coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer.

Background

Coffee is the most consumed stimulant in the world and one of the most widely consumed beverages. In some form or another, it transcends all boundaries and cultures.

Previously, I have reported on the health benefits of coffee and caffeine consumption. I would encourage you to check out that video for a full summary of it’s benefits.

Health Benefits of Coffee: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4fj6DBgsD8

Regarding cancer, coffee consumption has been linked to reduction in risk of:

  • Gastrointestinal (Throat, Liver)
  • Gynecological (Endometrial)
  • Prostate

Evidence regarding coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer is mixed and remains inconclusive. A previous meta-analysis suggested some protective effect, but the authors of this study wanted to generate a more robust, well-powered study with comprehensive data.

Methods

They investigated the association between coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in 5,145 cases and 4,097 controls from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer (MECC) study, a Population-based case–control study in northern Israel.

They examined this association by

  • Type of coffee
  • Cancer site (colon and rectum)
  • Ethnic subgroup (Ashkenazi Jews, Sephardi Jews, and Arabs)

Coffee data were collected by interview using a validated, semi-quantitative food frequency Questionnaire.

Results

Coffee consumption was associated with 26% lower odds of developing colorectal cancer

  • (OR (drinkers vs. nondrinkers), 0.74; 95% (CI), 0.64–0.86; P < 0.001)

The inverse association was also observed

  • Decaffeinated coffee (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68–0.99; P ¼ 0.04)
  • Boiled coffee (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71–0.94; P¼ 0.004).

Increasing consumption of coffee was associated with lower odds of developing colorectal cancer.

For example, compared with <1 serving/day, intake of

  • 1 to <2 servings/day (OR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.68–0.90; P < 0.001)
  • 2 to 2.5 servings/day (OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.51–0.68; P < 0.001)
  • >2.5 servings/day (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.39–0.54; P < 0.001)
  • Were all associated with decreasing risk of colorectal cancer as consumption increased from 1 to 2 to greater than 2.5 servings per day.

Conclusion

Coffee consumption provides, on average, a 26% reduction in risk of developing colorectal cancer.

This protective effect is dose-dependent meaning that as you scale up consumption, you get more benefit up to 3 servings per day.

If you have a family history of colorectal cancer, you should consider drinking coffee, even decaffeinated helps.

Original Article

Schmit, S. L., Rennert, H. S., & Rennert, G. (2016). Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, 25(4), 634-639. doi:10.1158/1055-9965.epi-15-0924

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